Curried Tempeh Sushi

by on January 15, 2007
FavoriteLoadingAdd to Recipe Box

Curried Tempeh Sushi

Sometimes two seemingly incompatible tastes come together and the result is magic. This, my friends, was not one of those times.

I don’t know what got me thinking that sushi with a filling of curried tempeh would be a good idea. I just know that once the idea was in my head, nothing was going to convince me that it was a bad one. Nothing except the first bite.

I had my first sign that something was just not right when my husband and I sat down to eat. He’d completely finished his salad and hadn’t touched the sushi. When I suggested he try it, he asked what was in it. “That curried tempeh I was making,” I answered. “Does curry go with sushi,” he asked. “No, silly, it’s FUSION. I’m being CREATIVE!” Famous last words.

We got through the meal and managed to eat most of the sushi, but I really regretted that I hadn’t made any other kinds. We weren’t even completely sure how to eat it. Wasabi was out because the curry itself was already spicy enough. Soy sauce didn’t seem right. I eventually found that dipping it in the sesame-ginger dressing left in my salad bowl actually improved it. We both ate a lot less sushi than we normally would, and since I’m supposed to be avoiding white rice, perhaps that’s a good thing.

All in all, it wasn’t horrible: we ate the meal without gagging, I had the remaining sushi for lunch the next day (with more sesame-ginger dressing), and we found that the leftover curried tempeh makes a pretty good sandwich filling. So, if you’re a “glass half full” kind of person, perhaps you could call this one a success. But I promise not to make it if you ever come over for dinner!

Curried Tempeh Sushi

Curried Tempeh Filling for Sushi or Sandwiches

4 ounces tempeh, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
1/4 teaspoon canola oil (optional)
1/2 cup red onion
1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 teaspoon mustard seed
1/2 teaspoon cumin seed
1 1/2 teaspoon good-quality mild curry powder (I used Maharajah–see the red thread of saffron in the close-up?)
1/8 teaspoon cayenne
1/2 cup light coconut milk (or vanilla soymilk mixed with 1/2 tsp. coconut extract)
salt to taste

Bring a small pot of water to a boil and put the tempeh cubes in it. Boil for about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and drain water. Set aside.

Either spray a non-stick pan lightly with canola oil or use 1/4 teaspoon of oil. Place over medium-high heat and add the onion. Cook until onion becomes translucent. Then add the ginger, garlic, mustard seeds, and cumin seeds. Stir and cook just until the seeds begin to pop. Add the curry, cayenne, and tempeh. Mash the tempeh into smaller pieces using a fork or a spatula as you stir. Add the coconut milk (or substitute) and salt and cook, stirring, until the liquid is mostly absorbed.

Allow to cool before using as a sushi filling. For sandwiches, use warm or cold, mixed with a little vegan mayo if desired.

I also used strips of yellow bell pepper in my sushi rolls. I’m not good at explaining how to roll sushi, so I’ll just direct you to this webpage that explains it well with photos.

Tags:

Never Miss a Recipe!

You'll keep up to date with new recipes and old ones you might have forgotten when you subscribe to NewsBites, the new FatFree Vegan newsletter. It's free, so sign up today!



Leave a Comment

Thanks for visiting my site! All comments are read and appreciated, and if you have a question, I will try to respond within a couple days. Note: If you are leaving a comment for the first time, it will be held for moderation. Be patient and it will appear as soon as I have a chance to approve it.

Want to have your photo alongside your comment? Sign up for a Gravatar!

Current ye@r *

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Meara December 24, 2010 at 11:57 am

I’m just curious as to why you would put a recipe on your blog which you think is gross? Doesn’t seem to make much sense…

Reply

2 SusanV December 24, 2010 at 1:23 pm

I said at the outset of this blog that I would be recording successes as well as failures. I’m lucky that there have been very few failures, but this is one of them. And although I didn’t love the recipe, there’s nothing wrong with it, just not my taste.

Reply

Previous post:

Next post: