Porcini Wonton Ravioli

by on March 12, 2008
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Porcini Wonton Ravioli

I went a little wrapper crazy on a recent trip to the Asian market. For some reason, I felt compelled to pick up eggless wonton wrappers, gyoza, spring roll wrappers, and thin sheets of tofu. I didn’t really have anything in mind to do with any of them, and since they were all frozen, I figured I could take my time deciding. But somewhere in the back of my mind lurked a recipe I’d seen that used wonton wrappers to make ravioli, so I decided wonton ravioli would be my first use of my huge wrapper supply.

I’d like to call this a Ridiculously Easy recipe, but I can’t. Though using wontons is easier than making pasta from scratch, any time you have to fill or wrap anything individually–spring rolls, sushi, gyoza–it’s a time consuming process. Though these ravioli were pretty simple to put together, I still had to make a filling, stuff them, boil them, and make a tomato sauce. It took a while and after I finished, my kitchen looked like the scene of a battle between the forces of Corn Starch and Blended Tomato. When my husband came in to clean the kitchen (as per our longstanding agreement that whoever doesn’t cook washes up), he was confronted with a tofu-porcini encrusted bowl and food processor, a blender coated with tomato reside, multiple pots to wash, and counters dusted with cornstarch. Nothing easy about that, but at least I didn’t have to deal with it!

So how do wonton wrappers taste as ravioli? In a word, thin. Though they swell when boiled and enclose the filling well, they lack the toothsome thickness of real pasta and, therefore, aren’t quite as filling as the real thing. And, as you can see from the photos below, their thinness allows the color of the filling to show through, which in the case of this mushroom filling isn’t really aesthetically pleasing. They are also quite large, so next time, instead of using two wrappers per ravioli, I will use one and fold it over into a rectangle.

I have to say that these were a little bit of work, but still, it’s been a long time since I’ve had ravioli, and to be able to whip up a batch on a weeknight was a treat. And I think they’d be amazing with the tofu-spinach ricotta filling from my favorite lasagna.

 

Porcini Wonton Ravioli


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{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

1 lovemyfamily June 24, 2010 at 8:55 pm

made this tonight, but just used one wonton wrapper per wonton, does that make sense? I made them into triangles. I actually doubled the recipe and freezed half (before cooking) for future use. my one year old ate a bite and seemed to like it but then spit out the next bite and my 3 year old ate just one wonton with sauce but that was pretty good for how he has been eating new things lately. I loved them and am glad I doubled the recipe. I am sure my husband will like them too, since he likes everything.

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2 Michelle December 29, 2010 at 10:06 pm

I love this! I didn’t have the right ingredients for the filling, but I wanted to try this tonight. I chopped some kalamata olives and cremini mushrooms, seasoned them with some garlic powder, coriander, and a tiny bit of red pepper flakes, and used that as the filling. I’ve always wanted to try won ton ravioli, and I love how these turned out. Thanks a million for this recipe! I look forward to trying it with your filling ingredients.

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3 Kelly March 21, 2011 at 11:35 pm

Where do you find vegan wonton wrappers? I can’t find them anywhere!

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4 SusanV March 21, 2011 at 11:45 pm

The only place I can find them is in Asian grocery stores, and even there, you have to read labels carefully because not all are vegan. The ones called gyoza rappers are more likely to be egg-free.

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5 Get Skinny, Go Vegan. March 22, 2011 at 7:46 am

Love the porcini filling!

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