New Orleans’ Style White Beans

by on December 28, 2010
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New Orleans' Style White Beans

Come on, tell me you’re tired of rich holiday food and are ready to settle down to some healthy–even homely–fare.  I know I am.  I never thought there could be such a thing as too much dessert, but after stuffing myself on pumpkin cheesecake, cherry-chocolate mousse pie, and the downright obscene rum- and margarine-soaked bread pudding that’s my husband’s specialty, I’m ready to swear off of sugar for a year while.  I don’t know about you, but I hate the sluggish way I feel whenever I’m overeating on foods that have too much fat and sugar.

So today I bring you a change from all the eye-candy (and actual candy) that you’ve probably been seeing on other blogs.  There are several tricks I could have employed to make this traditional Louisiana dish more photogenic, but then you wouldn’t have a real idea of how it’s supposed to look.  In particular, I could have cooked the beans for less time to leave them intact, but intact beans are exactly what you don’t want when making New Orleans’-style beans (sometimes referred to as cream-style beans).  You want some of the beans to hold together just enough so that they’re recognizable as beans but others to fall apart enough to create a thick, creamy sauce around the recognizable beans.  It’s a delicate balance that in bygone days took hours of simmering on the stove, but thanks to a couple of my favorite kitchen tools, the pressure cooker and the immersion blender, I can make creamy, flavorful beans in about an hour.  And so can you!

Before I get to the recipe, I want to announce a new feature that I’m very excited about, the Recipe Box.  Now you can bookmark recipes on this blog and store them in your own recipe box until you’re ready to use them.  To get started, just click the ADD TO RECIPE BOX link at the top of a post, and look for a link to that recipe in your recipe box.  Cool, huh? If you’re a frequent user of this site, you’ll want to register, which allows you to log in from any computer to see your recipe box.  Just fill out the registration form located at the bottom of the right sidebar. There’s a similar set-up in place at the main Fatfree Vegan Recipes page, so be sure to give it a try, too.

Now, get out that new pressure cooker you got for Christmas and cook some beans!

New Orleans' Style White Beans

New Orleans’ Style White Beans

(printer-friendly version)

Ingredients

  • 1 pound great northern beans, dried
  • 1 medium onion
  • 2 ribs celery
  • 1 small green pepper
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon white pepper
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce (or gluten-free tamari)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon Tabasco, or to taste
  • hickory smoked salt, to taste (optional, but good)

Instructions

  1. Soak the beans overnight. (Or do a quick-soak by putting them into the pressure cooker with enough water to cover them by three inches. Bring to high pressure and cook for 1 minute. Allow pressure to come down naturally before opening the cooker.)
  2. Drain the soaking liquid. Put the beans into the pressure cooker with 5 cups water and start heating, uncovered.
  3. Meanwhile, chop all vegetables fine, by hand or in a food processor. As you chop each one, add it to the pressure cooker. Add remaining ingredients except Tabasco and hickory smoked salt. Check water level in cooker and add another cup if there isn’t sufficient water to cover all ingredients by 1 inch.
  4. Seal the pressure cooker and set the timer for 12 minutes (electric) or bring to high pressure and cook for 12 minutes once pressure is reached. Remove from heat (or turn off electric cooker) and allow pressure to come down naturally.
  5. If pressure is not down in 20 minutes, quick-release the pressure. Check beans for doneness. They should be tender, and most should be starting to fall apart. If your beans are still tough, return them to high pressure for a few minutes. If beans are tender, add Tabasco and smoked salt and cook uncovered until liquid reduces and the cooking water starts to become more like a sauce. Stir often to make sure they are not burning on the bottom and to incorporate any dried beans on the sides of the pot. After about 20 minutes, if the liquid still seems watery rather than creamy, you can take an immersion blender and blend part of the beans (be sure to remove bay leaves first).
  6. Add additional salt to taste. Serve over hot rice with hot sauce on the table.

Notes

To cook in a regular pot, follow all directions, adding enough water to cover beans by an inch, cover, and cook on low until beans are beginning to break down and the water has become a sauce, at least 2 hours. Stir periodically and add more water as needed (may require several more cups).

Preparation time: 10 minute(s) | Cooking time: 50 minute(s)

Number of servings (yield): 8

Nutrition Facts

Nutrition (per serving): 170 calories, 5 calories from fat, <1g total fat, 0mg cholesterol, 392.5mg sodium, 716.3mg potassium, 31.8g carbohydrates, 10.1g fiber, 2.2g sugar, 10.6g protein, 2.7 points (not equivalent to current Weight Watchers’ PointsPlus).

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{ 100 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Jen December 28, 2010 at 5:26 pm

I have to admit I am scared of my pressure cooker! I really need to get over me fear if it will help me make things like this quickly. Your directions for using the pressure cooker are good. Perhaps I will have to go seize my fear and try this!

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2 Carrie Cullen December 28, 2010 at 5:47 pm

I do not have a pressure cooker. How would I make this in either a slow cooker or conventional on-the-stove method? Thanks!

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3 SusanV December 28, 2010 at 5:58 pm

The stovetop instructions are at the end of the recipe. To make it in the crockpot, just set the pot on low and cook for about 10 hours.

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4 Tom December 28, 2010 at 5:52 pm

Susan. Are the bay leaves taken out before immersion blending? Or are there times that you would keep the bay leaves in and blend them into a stew/soup?

Since I dont have a pressure cooker I will try to use regular soup pot. Sounds really good and hearty too. Thanks again.

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5 SusanV December 28, 2010 at 5:57 pm

I always remove the bay leaves before blending, just a personal preference. I haven’t done any research into eating blended bay leaves, but it strikes me that they would be too “pointy.”

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6 Dmitri September 19, 2011 at 12:37 pm

I accidentally did just that. And you’re right: they are way too “pointy”!

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7 grumphis December 29, 2010 at 11:46 pm

hi tom,
i have made the mistake of blending bay leaves before. it resulted in chunks of inedible, dry leaves randomly dispersed throughout the dish, creating a choking hazard. i called it my soup of regret.

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8 Michelle September 3, 2014 at 11:46 pm

Soup of regret, teehee!! I’ve made a few dishes like that. I’ve got the Gnocchi of Regret and the Birthday Vegan Key Lime “Pie” of Regret. I know you posted this four years ago, but it’s still funny. :-)

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9 chana December 28, 2010 at 7:10 pm

This looks great! Did you serve it as a stew, or part of a dish?

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10 SusanV December 28, 2010 at 7:14 pm

You serve it over rice as a main dish. I served it with broccoli, a green salad, and French bread.

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11 Ana December 28, 2010 at 7:34 pm

Hi Susan,
The soup looks lovely and hearty. I can’t wait to try it. I hope this doesn’t sound like sacrilege to you, but these days I don’t have all the time to cook I would like to have. Do you think the recipe would work with cannelini beans? I always keep a can of those in my pantry, they’re so good and convenient. Thanks!

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12 SusanV December 28, 2010 at 9:25 pm

Ana, it’s my fault for showing this in a serving bowl, but it isn’t a soup, just a bean dish that you serve on top of rice. If you wanted, I’m sure you could season canned beans with the same seasonings and it would be good, though it wouldn’t be the same recipe.

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13 Jeanette December 28, 2010 at 8:43 pm

This soup looks so rich and creamy that it should satisfy any hearty appetite. I dont’ think anyone would even know there’s no fat at all in this dish.

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14 Kelly December 29, 2010 at 1:13 am

Thank you so much!! My husband and I were trying to find something that wasn’t soaked in earth balance and full of sugar, etc. It was helpful to know that we weren’t the only ones :)

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15 laloofah December 29, 2010 at 6:00 am

This recipe looks delicious, so I have added it to my Recipe Box along with about a skazillion of your other recipes! That’s a great feature, thank for adding it and for pointing it out!

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16 Veggie December 29, 2010 at 6:16 am

I like beans but I cann’t take it too often for obious reasons even though I soak them overnight. Any suggestion?

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17 Anna December 29, 2010 at 9:44 am

Hey Veggie! If you introduce beans into your diet slowly, they shouldn’t cause too extravagant a problem. I eat them every day, probably for two meals at least, but started slowly when I became (mostly) vegan, and I don’t have that problem any more. Also, pouring out the soaking water, rinsing them once during soaking and then again before cooking tends to help remove a lot of the sugars that cause that issue as well – and not using the soaking water to cook.

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18 grumphis December 29, 2010 at 11:53 pm

veggie, i know what you mean. for me, beans weren’t too much of a problem when i went vegan, but after a while they started to cause extremely painful gas. especially bad is chick peas, which are my FAVOURITE BEAN! i think i have eaten so much hummus in the past 4 years my stomach is allergic.
what i do is presoak overnight, and in the morning i am sure to completely replace the water and rinse the beans extremely well, like Anna said. then the only thing i can do is pray and try not to be so gluttonous. if i have less than a cup of the bean dish, i generally have the same amount of gas as my boyfriend. more, and i am sent to sleep in the living room.

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19 allison January 1, 2011 at 1:40 pm

Veggie- try soaking your beans with a chunk of peeled ginger and then ALWAYS cook your a strip of Kombu- japanese seeweed strips. An enzyme in kombu helps breaks down the outer shell of the beans and makes them easier to digest.

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20 Ali December 29, 2010 at 9:18 am

There is a new restaurant near me that recently opened and is veg friendly. Just yesterday I had their braised white beans and was wishing for a good bean recipe to try – and here it is! I haven’t been on your site long but already love it and look forward to what you will post next.

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21 moxiedoesit December 29, 2010 at 9:49 am

Susan V! HOW did you know I got a pressure cooker for Christmas?!! ;) This looks delicious, I will be making it soon!

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22 depoebaydee December 29, 2010 at 12:05 pm

Do you have any suggestions if I do this using pre-cooked beans (I cook my beans in a crockpot overnight & freeze). Cooking time?

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23 janell December 29, 2010 at 12:07 pm

This looks so warm and delicious! I’ll try it in a regular cooking pot and share the results.

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24 Gluten Free Diva December 29, 2010 at 1:22 pm

I LOVE my pressure cooker. My cooking was taken to a whole new level when I began using one. In fact, I love it so much that I own two of them:). I have one question Susan. Is there a difference in terms of the effect beans have on one’s constitution (politely stated) when you soak them overnight versus quick-soaking them? Can’t wait to try your recipe! So easy and naturally gluten free if I use wheat-free tamari (San-J makes the best).

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25 SusanV December 29, 2010 at 8:15 pm

I don’t think the method of soaking makes a difference as long as you discard the soaking water before cooking. Hope you enjoy it!

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26 Lisa A. December 29, 2010 at 7:06 pm

Great recipe. I will definitely give it a try. I am just having a difficult time coming up with ideas of what to serve it with. Is there anything that I can use besides rice?

BTW, I forgot to tell you that I ended up making that apple pie with phyllo dough. It was great, but I still prefer making individual servings with phyllo dough. So next time I will be trying some kind of pockets or triangles with the same filling.

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27 SusanV December 29, 2010 at 8:17 pm

Thanks for the feedback about the apple pie. You can serve these beans over any grain, though rice is traditional. I use Cajun Grain brown rice, which has a great nutty flavor similar to basmati.

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28 kasha December 29, 2010 at 8:21 pm

I like to serve bean dishes like this over polenta, either soft or chilled then fried.

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29 Allison December 29, 2010 at 8:02 pm

Yum! This recipe looks great! I don’t have a pressure cooker, but I do have a slow cooker and I love beans in the slow cooker! Of course, I’ll need to adjust the cook time – how long do you think this recipe should cook in the slow cooker? Are there any other adjustments you would make? I look forward to your thoughts! Thanks for a great year of recipes! I love your blog. :)

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30 SusanV December 29, 2010 at 8:19 pm

I’d probably cook it on low for about 10 hours. I can’t think of any other adjustments I’d make. Please let me know how it comes out.

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31 kasha December 29, 2010 at 8:19 pm

This is EXACTLY the kind of foods I’ve been craving after the weeks of holiday indulgences. Thanks for sharing it; I never considered a New Orleans twist.

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32 oceanfrontcabin December 29, 2010 at 10:31 pm

Hi Susan: I’ve got my beans soaking for the night and will make recipe tomorrow (although I don’t have a pressure cooker). I’m excited about the recipe box and wanted to try it. But when I went to log in in order to use it, the log in page just flashed by, not allowing enough time to log in.

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33 SusanV December 30, 2010 at 8:56 am

Sorry about that! Different computers “see” websites in different ways. Try using this link to log in: http://blog.fatfreevegan.com/wp-login.php If that doesn’t work, see if you can use the form on the bottom of the right column to log in.

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34 Jennifer December 30, 2010 at 10:12 am

Thank you for this recipe. It is cooking on the stove as I type. Looking forward to starting the New Year off going back to E2L in a better way after some indulgences over the holidays. The recipe is the one I chose too start off with, since it looked s yummy.
Happy New Year. I’ve never posted before, but I have been your blog lurker for a long time.

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35 SusanV December 30, 2010 at 10:15 am

I hope you enjoy it, Jennifer! Thanks for coming out of lurkdom and posting, and Happy New Year to you too!

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36 Meriah December 30, 2010 at 10:16 am

Hi Susan!
All of your fabulous comfort-foodie recipes lately have convinced me that I need a pressure cooker. Do you have one that you would particularly recommend? (Or a style to avoid?) Thanks so much!

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37 SusanV December 30, 2010 at 10:22 am

Meriah, I’m currently recommending the Fagor 3-in-1 electric cooker because it is just so easy to use. It has a timer that you set, so you don’t have to stand around and watch while your food cooks, like you do with a stovetop pressure cooker. It’s really good for people who are new to pressure cooking. There’s a link to it in the post, the first time I mention “pressure cooker.”

Of that one is not an option (some people don’t like to cook in non-stick pressure cookers), then any of the new stainless steel cookers should be good. I favor Kuhn Rikon over the others, because I’ve found it to be more durable, but it has a high price. Fagor makes less expensive pressure cookers that get good reviews. No matter where you buy, I recommend looking at the user reviews on Amazon first.

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38 Meriah December 30, 2010 at 10:27 am

Thanks so much for the quick, response, Susan! I really appreciate it. Looking forward to doing some of the great recipes in a pressure cooker soon.

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39 Rochelle December 30, 2010 at 5:04 pm

Hi! I have this exact PC. I love it. I have found that it actually takes less time than the stove top PCs. I used stove tops on my electric stove and had scortching issues.

This one also makes perfect rice. I love it because you can also pre brown ingredients before cooking. Great unit at a great price IMHO

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40 Melomeals: Vegan for $3.33 a Day December 30, 2010 at 12:53 pm

I am soooo ready for healthier food. I have consumed more sugar in the past month than I can stand to think about!

I just love pressure cookers and beans!

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41 Marlis December 30, 2010 at 8:07 pm

I love beans! Love love love beans and this recipe sounds fabulous!

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42 Elizabeth December 30, 2010 at 10:09 pm

I made this tonight for dinner. So nice to have something Vegan after the holidays. I made it in a pot on the stove. It was delicious, but lots of extra water.

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43 SusanV December 31, 2010 at 9:00 am

I’m glad you liked it, and I’m not surprised about the extra water. Pressure cooking retains much more water than stovetop cooking, and it’s hard to know how much will be needed on the stove because of temperature differences. I always feel the best advice is to watch it closely and add water as needed.

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44 stools December 31, 2010 at 9:40 am

Now I really must think it over to buy a pressure cooker. This fantastic dish deserves it! Thank you.

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45 Tiffany December 31, 2010 at 12:22 pm

I’m dying to try this recipe – sounds perfect to eat new years day after the overindulgence that will likely take place!

That said, I’ve only got navy beans and white kidney beans on hand. Which do you think would be closer to the original consistency?

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46 SusanV December 31, 2010 at 12:45 pm

Either should be fine, but the white kidney beans will probably cook more like the great northerns that I used, so you can use the same time that I did.

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47 Tiffany January 1, 2011 at 8:52 pm

Thanks Susan! Made this with the white kidney beans and they are fantastic. I also used a red pepper since that was what was I had on hand and substituted a carrot for the celery. Probably not quite like the original but worked beautifully. Even my non-vegan husband liked it!

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48 Terri December 31, 2010 at 1:29 pm

This is my first post although I’ve been a fan of your site for a while now. After overindulging during the holidays I’m getting back on track following the Eat to Live 6 week program. I have a couple more days before I go back to work/school and I’m making and freezing some of your soups and stews and wonder if you think this recipe would freeze well. It looks delicious! If you have any freezer favorites please let me know =) Happy New Year!!

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49 SusanV December 31, 2010 at 1:53 pm

Thanks for leaving your first comment! I think these beans will freeze fine, and though I don’t have any freezer favorites, almost all of my ETL friendly recipes should freeze well. Beans and grains freeze well, and only recipes where the vegetables need to be fresh, like stir fries, would have problems. Good luck with ETL in the new year!

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50 Leah December 31, 2010 at 3:15 pm

This white bean dish looks amazing. Thanks for posting, I’ll try it out on my 6 week cleanse next week! (sans salt)
While we are on the subject of beans. I was wondering if anyone knows a tip to getting the beany smell out of pinto beans?
I soak them overnight, change the water a few times and then add new water and slow cook them. They are usually delicious the day of, but the day after when I pull them out of the fridge they have a very gassy smell. Any hints?
Thanks,
Leah

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51 Colleen January 2, 2011 at 11:13 am

You may say this could have been altered to be more photogenic if authenticity were to be sacrificed, but I’ve returned to this post multiple times since the 28th and all but drooled over the creaminess pictured. I’m happy to report I finally walked away from my computer and DID something, and I’ve got the beans soaking now for dinner tonight :) I’m ready for something nourishing and healthy, too, and while I knew all beans were a decent source of potassium, I had no idea there was so much in great northerns! I’ll have to add them more heavily into rotation to avoid the nasty potassium supplements my doc put me on.

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52 Pam January 2, 2011 at 4:13 pm

Hi Susan,

Thanks for such a GREAT website/blog! My recipe box is having issues and instead of a list of titles and recipes, I’m getting a “warning!” and a long statement that ends in “line 79″. Any ideas what’s going on?

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53 SusanV January 2, 2011 at 6:19 pm

Pam, I’m so sorry the recipe box isn’t working right for you. I’ll see what I can find out, and if I find a solution, I’ll post it here.

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54 SusanV January 3, 2011 at 9:42 am

Pam, you might try logging out of the site and then logging back in. That seems to resolve some problems. I’ll keep looking for other solutions, just in case.

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55 Kristi @ Veggie Converter January 2, 2011 at 5:24 pm

Yum. I’m always using black beans, I rarely remember how I love white beans, too. This looks delicious. Thanks for the reminder!

Kristi @
Veggie Converter

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56 jodye @ 'scend food January 3, 2011 at 2:23 am

White beans never fail to please my palate. I love the inherent creaminess they add to any dish, without being overly heavy. This is a dish I’ll certainly have to try.

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57 Ingrid January 3, 2011 at 7:20 pm

THis would be fabulous on a day like today~!

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58 lea January 4, 2011 at 8:33 am

I made this dish using the stove top method and it was excellent! A life long vegetarian, I went vegan about eight months ago. I thought that my diet would be more limited without dairy and eggs, but instead I have tried more new foods than I ever imagined. Thank you soooo much Susan for your awesome blog! I have made probably 35 of your recipes and they have all turned out perfectly delicious – keep up the good work!

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59 heidi January 4, 2011 at 5:38 pm

Thanks for a great, simple recipe! For crockpot folks: I’ve had good luck with beans in the slow cooker. Don’t soak them overnight or they’re too mushy. Start them in the morning, get them up on high to get going, then put them on low for the day. I loved this recipe, although I had to use a lot of salt substitute and seasonings. The smoky flavor is yummy. Super on a cold night!

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60 Culinarian January 5, 2011 at 5:44 pm

I am more than ready for some healthy and homely fare! I love white beans, especially when they are warm, soup-like, and mushy. Thanks for sharing!!

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61 Charanjit January 7, 2011 at 7:41 pm

Helllo
I’m so glad I have come upon this website! Im on my way to lose my baby weight and your website looks like it’s going to help me alot! I’m so excited.

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62 Mary January 8, 2011 at 6:11 pm

Susan, this was a great round-up. Your readers had a very good year. I am new to your blog but will be back and visit often. I hope you have a wonderful day. Blessings…Mary

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63 Peggy January 11, 2011 at 2:22 pm

I made this as written, except I don’t have a pressure cooker so I soaked the beans overnight and then put them in a slow cooker for about 8 hours on low. Worked beautifully and the resulting soup/stew was delicious. We ate it over rice that night and since then I have eaten them plain (like soup) with whole wheat pita, and over a baked potato. When I make it again I will put in a lot less water. I ended up with almost an inch of liquid on top of the cooked beans. I dipped a lot of it out before I used the immersion blender to make the broth creamy. This is definitely a “make again” recipe. Thank you!

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64 Erin January 11, 2011 at 7:47 pm

I’ve made these twice in the past week, each time I’ve changed it just a little and each time I love them more. Thanks for posting this, it’s an inspiration, literally.

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65 DeniseC January 15, 2011 at 4:22 pm

Have you tried liquid smoke instead of hickory smoked salt? I always have hickory and mesquite varieties on hand and avoid the possibility of too much salt that way. Liquid smoke can usually be found in the spice and/or condiment sections of groceries/supermarkets. Two brands I know of are Wrights and Colmans (I use Wrghts).

You might try soaking beans (and all seeds to be eaten) with an added acid (like lemon or lime juice, vinegar, ascorbic acid or acidic cultured liquid, like kombucha or water kefir), about a tablespoon per cup of water. While soaking with just water helps deactivate the enzyme inhibitor and active the enzymes, the acid helps break phytic acid from binding minerals (and leaching minerals from other foods being eaten at the same time). You can read more about it here: http://bonzaiaphrodite.com/2010/08/the-importance-of-soaking-nuts-grains-and-legumes/ .

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66 Jessica January 21, 2011 at 10:37 am

I made this soup last night and it was amazing. My kids (3 of them) each had two helpings! Thanks for the recipe!

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67 philocrates January 21, 2011 at 10:10 pm

This one is a keeper for us. It was excellent. Easy enough to convert into a ‘New Orleans’ Soup. I simply put the rice [wild rice and brown rice or grain mix] in the soup. And when I feel like it toss in some diced tomatoes. Suits after another …. snowstorm. It also let me try out my Russell Hobbs electric pressure cooker. Loved it. From dry beans to hot soup in 45 minutes. I did lose all the salt except the Braggs. I used smoked pepper instead of smoked salt. Suits this recipe much better.

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68 shalott January 30, 2011 at 9:52 am

These were so savory and delicious. Whole family loved these. I’m about to make them again and I’m mad at myself for not soaking the beans last night. This time Ill double the recipe. Thanks for a great recipe

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69 Pamela February 7, 2011 at 9:40 am

so I have been eying this recipe for awhile now, I don’t have a pressure cooker but read below that you could use a crock pot. So I did yesterday, I loved it!!!! I served it over brown rice with a side of collard greens. My partner who is the most finicky eater I have ever known and usually is never down for vegan foods even liked it! It was so good that I decided that it should be my breakfast this morning as well. I am not a fan of traditional breakfast foods and prefer more savory foods in the morning. I am full I feel good and boy did it taste great!

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70 Linda Meziere February 10, 2011 at 11:24 pm

Made this for dinner today in a regular pot and LOVED it! Thanks.

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71 Anna February 12, 2011 at 1:04 pm

This recipe inspired me to get out the pressure cooker I got – not last Christmas – but the one before. I admit I had been scared to use it – I still am a little, but now that I’ve used it safely once, hopefully I’ll get over it. The soup is bubbling away on the stove now and I’m having a hard time not eating some before it’s finished – it tastes pretty delicious so far. This is a wonderful blog – I found you the other day looking for a vegan cookie recipe – I just finished reading the book Eating Animals (by James Safran Foer) which makes a pretty compelling argument for not eating them – so here I am – looking forward to trying many more of your delicious looking recipes – thanks Susan!

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72 stevenukas February 17, 2011 at 7:31 pm

this is really delicious. The only thing I would add is black pepper,I like it a little more spicy.

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73 Cindy February 23, 2011 at 5:48 pm

I just made these lovely beans. I am at the end of the recipe. Do I really add a whole tablespoon of Tabasco? That’s seems like a lot!! I have put 1/2 tsp. in the beans, along with 1 tsp. of liquid smoke. Do I dare put any more Tabasco or was that a misprint?

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74 SusanV February 23, 2011 at 6:09 pm

Cindy, just do it to taste. If the beans taste good to you, don’t risk adding too much. I tend to like things hot, so 1 tablespoon might be too much to you.

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75 Get Skinny, Go Vegan. February 27, 2011 at 6:45 pm

Don’t ya just love the new pressure cookers?? I was also afraid of them growing up, but now with the super nuevo type, they are so much more approachable. I make dog food (organic rice, beans, veggies) in ours everyday. Of course I have made hundreds of soups also & just love being able to make something from “nothing” so quickly. Actually reminds me, I need to replace a tiny steam guard in ours now!!
Love these Mardi Gras posts…..St. Louis has a huge drunken fest (not a real pretty sight) each year, and it’s nice to know that if I ever host a Mardi Gras event, that I will have a great resource for recipes!

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76 Get Skinny, Go Vegan. March 1, 2011 at 7:01 am

What type of pressure cooker do you use??
To anyone who is “afraid” of pressure cookers, they make awesome “new” ones that don’t “open” when they have pressure!!

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77 SusanV March 1, 2011 at 7:33 am

I mainly use a Fagor 3-in-1 electric pressure cooker now because it’s even easier than my stove-top cooker, which is a Kuhn Rikon. They’re both extremely safe!

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78 Banjo13 March 9, 2011 at 1:45 pm

Susan, I love this recipe. I made it last week. I want to eat it everyday. I’m new to your website but there are so many recipes I want to make already. Thank you!

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79 Christopher Kandrat March 22, 2011 at 9:50 am

Made it recently, and it was very good! Thank you.

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80 c@ August 18, 2011 at 8:51 pm

Question: Aside from cost and sodium, is there a reason to only use dried beans instead of canned? I do use dried beans when I have time; but when I’m really hungry and just need to get something to eat, should I not eat canned beans?

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81 SusanV August 18, 2011 at 8:56 pm

No, it’s just that this particular recipe is written for dried beans. To change it to canned beans would take several changes to ingredients and directions, and the results just wouldn’t be the same.

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82 Kumquat September 26, 2011 at 9:06 pm

I tried this recipe tonight with my shiny new pressure cooker with a few subs. I had soaked lima beans on hand, so used those instead of northern. Omitted garlic and hot sauce (due to allergies), used more pepper and added in several hefty dashes of liquid smoke. Turned out great! I was so excited to get a pressure cooker for the short work it makes of cooking beans and this recipe proved it. Thanks for a great first run!

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83 Coloradomtnmamma December 14, 2011 at 8:52 pm

Made this today in my crock pot. Delicious over rice with a good bread. Kids liked it with olive oil for dipping bread. Took only 8 hours in the pot.

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84 Kurt December 29, 2011 at 6:57 pm

Just made this tonight… and wow it was good. It even went over great with my, usually quite finicky, 4 year old.

I did substitute a few taps of chipotle chili powder for the hickory salt (which I don’t have)… it did quite well to add both heat and smoke to the dish.

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85 caterina February 11, 2012 at 9:02 am

I’m totally making this tonight! Could I use black pepper instead of white, which I don’t have?

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86 Susan Voisin February 11, 2012 at 9:30 am

Sure, just add it to taste because white pepper is hotter than black. Hope you enjoy!

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87 caterina February 11, 2012 at 1:37 pm

I just made it and it is delicious!!! Thank you for the recipe!!

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88 Lfletche December 12, 2012 at 3:00 pm

My very first recipe ever made with an electric pressure cooker! What a challenge! The end result was well worth the frustration. I learned a lot and it will be so much easier next time. So glad it turned it OK. It was my learning curve that caused me issues, not the recipe! Good thing I had a good recipe and good instructions to work with. Thank you!

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89 Susan Voisin December 12, 2012 at 3:03 pm

I’m sorry it was frustrating but glad it worked out in the end. Was the problem with the pressure cooker’s instructions or mine? It would help me to know so that I can make my instructions easier to follow for first-time PC users.

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90 Orthohawk December 13, 2012 at 11:48 am

I had some white beans from our local Amish grocery store in my pantry (CHEAP!) and looked for navy bean recipes and found this. Was wondering, have you ever made this with other types of beans? My favorites are kidney beans (the 10-minute boil and 2 hour soak method takes care of both the phytohemoglutanin problem and the gas problem……beans seem to be less gassy (to me anyway) with the boil and soak method), and i’m sure black beans would be great as well.

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91 Orthohawk December 21, 2012 at 11:29 am

Hi Susan.
I don’t know if it’s the temp at which my crock pot cooks, but it took about 18 hours on low when I made this to get to the “cream style.” I just used the boil and soak method the evening before and put them in right before I went to bed. By 6 the next evening they were perfect. One caveat, though: Don’t add the salt or soy sauce till they’ve been cooking for least 12 hours! They don’t break down otherwise.
I also have made this recipe with red kidney beans (boil for at least 10 minutes in the boil and soak phase!) and also black beans; both were fantastic! I also used smoked paprika instead of the hickory salt. This is my new default bean recipe!

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92 Elizabeth December 23, 2012 at 6:22 pm

I made this recipe tonight and all I can say is WOW!! The taste and texture of the beans were wonderful – very creamy and satisfying. My 15 month-old daughter loved it, as did my husband & I. I have to admit that I did add some cooked sausage I had (for the carnivore husband). Next time I will try it without any meat and I think I’ll reduce the salt a little. Thanks for a great recipe!!

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93 John Bjo January 3, 2013 at 5:19 pm

This looks great! Where can I get more bean recipes similar to this with pressure cooker instructions?

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94 Melissa August 21, 2013 at 3:49 pm

I loved this despite longer cooking time I think my beans were just stubborn lol did about an hour or so then just cooked it down more not under pressure after adding hot sauce.

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95 Angela August 28, 2013 at 11:05 am

These are amazing! The whole family is just crazy for them. Mmmmmmmm!

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96 moonwatcher March 1, 2014 at 3:49 pm

Hi Susan,

Did you know Moscow Idaho celebrates Mardi Gras, complete with beads and a parade? Many people also dress up, lots of them in black and white. The community radio station is having a fundraising dinner tonight, as they do every year around Mardi Gras, with a Cajun theme. So even up here in the frozen north, we get into the spirit.

I forgot about it so completely today that I wondered what the “racket” was when I heard the parade starting up just a few blocks from my house. Too cold to go down and stand out there today, but never fear. My Mardi Gras “reflex” had kicked in all on its own–I soaked white beans yesterday to make this recipe!!

However, like so many things I do, I did it the slow way–and backwards–and they still came out great. No pressure cooker, so I was going to do them in the pot. Then I realized I wanted to have some plain beans to put in Romeo’s food. So I cooked all the beans in a extra water, and spooned some out just plain for him. When we got back from our walk, I chopped up onion, bell pepper and celery nice and small and sauteed them in a pan with all the seasonings. Then I dumped them in the pot with the beans and let them heat up. Then I took out about a cup of this mixture and whirred it up in the food processor. Then I stirred it back in and let it all simmer together on really low heat. I didn’t have tabasco so I used some Cajun garlic sauce and smoked paprika instead. I ‘ve got a nice pot of New Orleans style white beans–backward and in slow motion–to warm me up during our new cold snap. Happy Mardi Gras!!

xoxo

moonwatcher

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97 Kristin April 4, 2014 at 12:11 pm

Maria, I didn’t know about the Mardi Gras festivities in Moscow. Interesting! As for slow and backward, I’ve done this recipe in the crock pot, on the stove, and in the pressure cooker, and it comes out great every single time. Each is a little different, but they all make the house smell good and taste great!

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98 Mary March 9, 2014 at 4:21 pm

Just wanted to say, I love so many of your recipes, but this has got to be the best bean soup in the world! I swear I think I could live off this!!! Bless You for all your wonderful recipes but special blessings for this one!!!

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99 Kristin April 4, 2014 at 12:08 pm

So, I made two batches of this over the past weekend, and had some left in the fridge today. I also had a half a box of whole wheat pasta and some random veggies that needed to be used up. I cooked the veggies (onion, mushrooms, broccoli, shredded brussels sprouts, some collard greens that were looking a little tired, and some asparagus) with some cajun seasoning, then tossed in the pasta and my leftover N.O. Style White Beans along with a little of the pasta cooking water.

As if we didn’t already love this recipe enough, now it’s pasta sauce, too!

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100 Kell November 3, 2014 at 9:09 pm

WOW! Finally a vegan chef that’s nailed it. I gorged on this till I was sick. Thanks for sharing. Now… back to the store so I can make some more!

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